Ellen Goodman is a rare writer and thinker who senses emerging shifts in our public and private lives, often altering perceptions of confounding issues. For more than 30 years, her Pulitzer Prize winning commentary appeared in more than 400 newspapers nationwide and she is the author of seven books. Ellen has been an innovative force in American journalism. She has commented on the tumult of social change and its impact on families, and shattered the mold of men writing exclusively about politics.

Ellen has followed the women’s movement—which she thinks of literally as the movement of women from one lifestyle to many. She’s followed that moving target from Supermom’s adventures to Sarah Palin’s misadventures.

She’s written about the challenges of bioethics as well as those of parenting in an era when mothers and fathers have become the counter-culture—the people who have to counter the Miley Cyrus and YouTube culture. Her tools in this work, she has said are “skepticism, the perspective that we call humor and, I guess, something in the DNA that says, ‘hey, wait a minute.’” She has also written about demise of civility and the rise of food fight journalism and food fight politics.

Today she follows the headlines and trends surrounding end-of-life care topics, writing to debunk the myths, taboos and fears associated with end-of-life care conversations and the misinformation that looms in the media regarding death panels and assisted suicide.

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